Life sentence handed down to man convicted in cold case murder of girlfriend

A man convicted for killing his girlfriend in 2002 has been handed a life sentence.

Stephane Parent will not be eligible for parole for 17 years.

Parent was found guilty of second-degree murder last October in the death Adrienne McColl.

Read more:

Stephane Parent remains in custody, court case put over a month for 2002 death of Adrienne McColl

She was just 21 years old when her body was found in a ditch near Nanton on Feb. 17, 2002, after she went missing on Valentine’s Day.

McColl had been strangled and beaten to death.

Parent was arrested and charged 16 years to the day her body was found, thanks to advancements in forensic technology which allowed police to discover new evidence in the cold case.

Read more:

Stephane Parent convicted of 2nd-degree murder in Calgary girlfriend’s death nearly 20 years ago

Sentencing had originally been scheduled for Nov. 29, 2021, but was adjourned to Friday.

Parent did not have a defense lawyer present and didn’t submit a suggested sentence, but shook his head as the decision came down.

When asked if he had any objection to the Crown’s written submission, Parent continued to defend himself, saying he was not guilty.

He was also handed a lifetime firearms ban.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Company facing charges over dust cloud from demolition at Hamilton's Specialty Bar

The Ministry of the Environment is investigating after the demolition of an old steel mill building sent a massive dust cloud into the air in Hamilton's north end.

A demolition company is facing multiple charges in connection with the toppling of a Hamilton building that sent a dust cloud swirling over parts of the city in late 2019.

Ontario’s Ministry of the Environment confirmed to Global News that Delsan-A.I.M. Environmental Services Inc. is the company facing offences under the provincial Environmental Protection Act.

A spokesperson for the ministry says the three offences are related to discharge of dust, a demolition carrying dust beyond limits of a property, and failure to report the release of a potential contaminant.

The building that came down was a large green structure, estimated to be 37 metres high (120-feet), on the former site of Hamilton Specialty Bar at 319 Sherman Avenue North.

Read more:

Demolition of old Hamilton Specialty Bar building results in massive dust cloud

A video of the demolition on Sept. 30, 2019, filmed by Patrick Ferguson and posted to Smash Salvage’s Instagram, showed clouds of dark black matter billowing out of the tower as it crumbled to the ground.

Test results on matter from the cloud, that floated over Hamilton’s east end minutes after the demolition, were consistent with ordinary minerals and metals found in a simple dirt sample, according to a Hamilton Public Health probe completed months later.

Following a joint testing initiative from the province and the city, associate medical officer of health Dr. Bart Harvey told Global News the particles in question were about 20 to 40 microns in size and ‘too big’ to be deeply inhaled into human lungs.

“These particles are so large that they would get caught up in the mucous lining of the nose and the throat and essentially would be sneezed out or coughed out,” said Harvey

Harvey also said the amount of dust they believe was spread into the community was “relatively modest.”

Read more:

Adverse health affects from Hamilton demolition dust cloud ‘unlikely’: city

The executive director of Environment Hamilton, who urged residents affected by the dust cloud to contact the ministry, says she was not surprised to hear the province was moving forward with charges.

“Certainly our provincial environmental legislation is designed so that if there is an off-site impact caused that that’s a violation,” Lynda Lukasik told Global News.

“I don’t think anybody would argue that there wasn’t an offsite impact caused by this problem.”

The incident sparked talk amongst councillors at City Hall with Hamilton’s planning committee approving a motion to seek policy changes in early 2021.

Read more:

Hamilton councillor seeks stricter rules for demolishing industrial buildings

Ward 3 Coun. Nrinder Nann, who brought the motion forward, said soot from the demolition was deposited on homes, cars, gardens, outdoor furniture and playground equipment throughout the affected communities.

Nann’s motion asks the province for a wide-ranging expansion of demolition requirements including mandatory notification to all neighbours of the date and time, and a list of any contaminants that could enter the air, water and soil, as well as their potential health impacts.

Lukasik hopes any fine that might be collected through the court process will be spent by the city to make improvements in neighborhoods that were directly impacted by demolition.

“Whether it’s planting trees or doing something to help to green up the neighborhood or improve it in some way to us just seems like the appropriate thing to do,” said Lukasik.

The Ministry of the Environment revealed the matter will be addressed by a court on March 24.

Global News has reached out to Delsan-AIM for comment on the charges.

The company has yet to respond as of Friday afternoon.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas welcome baby born via surrogate

Nick Jonas and Priyanka Chopra are new parents.

The couple shared a big announcement on Instagram Friday: that they had welcomed a baby via surrogate.

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Priyanka Chopra reveals the ‘one rule’ she and Nick Jonas agreed on when they got married

“We are overjoyed to confirm that we have welcomed a baby via surrogate,” Jonas, 29, and Chopra, 39, both posted on their Instagram accounts. “We respectfully ask for privacy during this special time as we focus on our family.”

Multiple outlets report the couple’s baby, a girl, arrived last weekend on Jan. 15, and it’s “unclear” what name the couple has chosen for their first child.

In a recent interview with Vanity Fair, Chopra offered an interesting answer when asked whether her mother might be expecting to see a grandchild at some point.

READ MORE:

Priyanka Chopra Jonas on having kids with Nick Jonas: ‘They’re a big part of our desire for the future’

“They’re a big part of our desire for the future,” she said, referring to children, hiding the secret that she and Jonas had already enlisted the services of a surrogate to start a family.

“By God’s grace, when it happens, it happens,” she added.

GALLERY: Hollywood’s baby boom continues

© 2022 Entertainment Tonight Canada, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Toronto police superintendent charged after alleged impropriety in promotion process

A Toronto police superintendent is facing several charges under the Police Services Act amid an investigation into alleged impropriety during a recent promotion process.

Global News previously spoke to multiple sources who said that the Toronto Police Service was investigating a high-ranking officer who allegedly leaked answers to fellow officers trying to get a promotion.

A Toronto police spokesperson confirmed that an investigation was underway into “allegations of impropriety in a recent promotional process.”

At the time, sources told Global News that Supt. Stacy Clark was the officer under investigation.

Read more:

Senior Toronto Police Officer under investigation for alleged impropriety in promotion process

On Friday, TPS spokesperson Meaghan Gray said Clarke is facing seven charges under the Police Services Act, including breach of confidence, discreditable conduct and insubordination.

Gray said the details of the allegations will be made available after Clarke makes her first appearance at the Toronto Police Tribunal, which is tentatively scheduled for Monday morning.

“While the Police Services Act prevents us from commenting further, we can also say that it is the chief’s intention to bring in an external prosecutor and adjudicator for this matter,” Gray added.

The Toronto Police Tribunal is a quasi-judicial forum where allegations of serious breaches of the Police Services Act against officers are adjudicated.

Just last year, Clarke was promoted to the superintendent role, becoming one of only two Black female police superintendents in Canada.

— with files from Catherine McDonald and Caryn Lieberman

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

COVID-19: Saskatchewan reports database error, 9 new deaths recorded

Saskatchewan health officials say a database error has been discovered in the province’s COVID-19 dashboard.

Officials reported nine more COVID-19-related deaths on Friday. The province has not reported a COVID-19-related death since Jan. 6, 2022.

“The notable length of time without a new death being reported initiated an audit of reporting systems, which resulted in the discovery of a database error.”

Chief Medical Health Officer Dr. Saqib Shahab will be discussing preliminary results of an internal audit relating to these numbers at 2 p.m.

Read more:

Sask. surge plan could move government workers to ‘non-medical’ health-care roles

Officials are also reporting 1,233 new PCR COVID-19 positive test results on Friday.

Friday’s new cases come from PCR test results that are completed by the Saskatchewan Health Authority. The province’s case counts do not include rapid test results that are self-administered by residents.

The province is also reporting 215 people in hospital with COVID-19, including 23 in intensive care units.

This is a developing news story. More to come.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Drug busts net $148K in fentanyl, 5 facing charges: London police

Five London, Ont., residents are facing drug trafficking-related charges after police say they seized nearly $150,000 worth of fentanyl during a series of drug busts in the city on Thursday.

Officers raided three addresses on Belmont Drive, Commissioners Road West and King Street on Thursday, seizing 743 grams of fentanyl valued at $148,600, police said.

Police say they also seized 26.5 grams of crack cocaine valued at $2,650, along with $8,000 in cash.

Read more:

Transport truck collides with building in Listowel, Ont., Main Street closed

Four people, aged 18, 29, 36 and 39, have been jointly charged with one count of possession of a Schedule I substance for the purpose of trafficking in relation to the fentanyl.

Police say the 29-year-old, the 39-year-old and another person, aged 60, are also jointly charged with a separate count of possession of a Schedule I substance for the purpose of trafficking, also in relation to the fentanyl.

The 29-year-old faces an additional charge of failure to comply with a release order, while the 60-year-old is additionally charged with one count of possession of a Schedule I substance.

Police say the 29-year-old accused and the 39-year-old accused have been remanded into custody, while the 36-year-old accused is set to appear in court on Feb. 25. The 18-year-old and 60-year-old charged in the case are due back in court April 22, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police or Crime Stoppers.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

One suspect still at large in fatal 2021 shooting, Winnipeg police say

Winnipeg police have only one suspect left at large in connection with the Nov. 29, 2021 shooting death of Tyler Yarema.

Members of the police homicide unit arrested Jake Steven Ducharme — who is now in custody facing second-degree murder charges — on Thursday, leaving 23-year-old Bryce Alexander Keating the only outstanding suspect.

Read more:

One suspect in custody, two still at large in 2021 St. Vital shooting death

Keating is the subject of a warrant for second-degree murder, and police are advising Winnipeggers not to approach him if he’s spotted, as he may be armed and dangerous.

Anyone with information about his whereabouts is asked to call the homicide unit at 204-986-6508, Crime Stoppers at 204-786-TIPS (8477) or 911.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

COVID-19: MLHU reports 2 deaths, LHSC caring for 153 inpatients

Jump to: HospitalizationsCases and testingOutbreaksVaccinationsOntarioElgin and OxfordHuron and PerthSarnia and Lambton


The Middlesex-London Health Unit reported two deaths and 224 COVID-19 cases on Friday, a day after reporting six deaths.

The two deaths reported Friday both involve men in their 80s. One was associated with a retirement home and the other was not associated with any long-term care or retirement residence.

Based on a graph of the vaccination status of all deaths in the previous six weeks, the two were fully vaccinated.

The London Health Sciences Centre, meanwhile, reported 153 COVID-19 inpatients in its care. Last Friday, LHSC was caring for 132 COVID-19 inpatients.

Hospitalizations

As noted, LHSC is caring for 153 inpatients with COVID-19, up from 132 a week ago.

Of those, 22 are in adult critical care, compared to 21 a week ago.

Six of the 153 are in Children’s Hospital, with zero in pediatric critical care. Last Friday, six were in Children’s Hospital with five or fewer in pediatric critical care.

Read more:

Canada’s Omicron wave of COVID-19 may have peaked, top doctors say

Of the 153 patients, 91 are being treated for COVID-19 while 62 others in hospital have incidental COVID-19 infections (meaning they were admitted for another reason). Last Friday, those figures were 78 and 54, respectively. LHSC has been reporting those figures since Jan. 10.

“We’ve certainly confirmed and found every single day that the majority of people that are here that are positive (for) COVID would not be in hospital if they didn’t have COVID,” chief medical officer Dr. Adam Dukelow told Global News on Friday.

“But because the prevalence of the disease is so high in the community and there’s so many people with it that we’re also seeing a large, large number of people that have it just incidentally and are here for another reason.”

Dukelow added that regardless of whether someone attends hospital due to COVID-19 or if they attend for another reason and are found to have COVID-19 after being tested during admission, hospitals have to use more resources in terms of infection control measures.

Among staff, there are 297 cases, down from 511 a week ago.

Read more:

Ontario-based long-term care company suddenly deletes its Twitter account

There are several outbreaks at LHSC at St. Joseph’s Health Care London. Further information can be found in the Outbreaks section, below.

St. Joseph’s Health Care London reported 16 cases among patients or residents in its care as of Thursday and 99 health-care workers with COVID-19, compared to 77 patient/resident cases and 132 staff cases a week ago.

Among the 16 patient/resident cases, seven are at Mount Hope Centre for Long Term Care and nine are at Parkwood Institute Main Building.

Cases and testing

As mentioned, the MLHU reported two deaths on Friday involving men in their 80s. Both were fully vaccinated and one was associated with a retirement home.

The MLHU reported 224 cases Friday, compared to 253 a week ago. Due to changes in eligibility for PCR testing, daily case counts are no longer considered a fully reliable reflection of COVID-19 activity in the region.

Read more:

COVID-19: Quebec sees 59 more deaths, another drop in hospitalizations

The Middlesex-London Health Unit says individuals who are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms should consider themselves to be positive for COVID-19 and self-isolate.

The health unit has provided information on what to do if you develop symptoms, test positive on a rapid test or PCR test or have been exposed to someone who has tested positive.

In total, there have been 27,257 confirmed cases since the onset of the pandemic, including 2,524 active cases (a decrease of 65), 24,451 resolved cases (an increase of 294) and 282 deaths (an increase of two).

The test positivity rate for the week of Jan. 9 was 22.4 per cent, down from 24 per cent the week of Jan. 2 and 28.3 per cent the week of Dec. 26, 2021.

Outbreaks

The Salvation Army Centre of Hope said the MLHU had declared an outbreak at the shelter on Wednesday. As of Thursday evening, nine clients had tested positive for COVID-19 and another nine were identified as close contacts.

Read more:

28 in isolation amid COVID-19 outbreak at The Salvation Army Centre of Hope in London, Ont.

LHSC is reporting the following outbreaks:

  • University Hospital
    • U10 Subacute Medicine and Palliative Care, declared Jan. 16, involving five or fewer patient cases
    • U6 200/300 Cardiac Surgery Inpatients, declared Jan. 16, involving five or fewer patients and five or fewer staff cases
    • U5 100/300 Cardiology Inpatients, declared Jan. 16, involving five or fewer patient cases and five or fewer staff cases
    • A8 Surgery Inpatient, declared Jan. 14, involving 11 patient cases and five or fewer staff cases
    • A9 Inpatients 100 and 200 Corridors, declared Jan. 11, involving 19 patient cases
    • 7IP Clinical Neurosciences, declared Jan. 1, involving 17 patient cases and five or fewer staff cases
  • Victoria Hospital
    • B72 – Adult Mental Health Inpatients, declared Jan. 17, involving five or fewer patients

A previously reported outbreak at Victoria Hospital’s B7-200 Adult Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit, declared Dec. 31, involving seven patient cases and five or fewer staff cases, is no longer listed as active by LHSC.

St. Joseph’s Health Care London is reporting the following outbreaks:

  • Mount Hope Centre for Long Term Care: SM2
  • Parkwood Institute Main Building: 3KE, 4BE and 2Perth

Outbreaks at Parkwood Institute Main Building’s 4AE and 4AN units have ended.

Read more:

Unvaccinated patients and staffing shortages: A look inside the ICU at one Toronto hospital

The MLHU is reporting the following institutional outbreaks:

  • Arbor Trace Alzheimer’s Special Care Centre, facility-wide, declared Jan. 4
  • Babcock Community Care Centre, facility-wide, declared Dec. 31
  • Chartwell Parkhill, Countryside Unit, declared Jan. 1
  • Chelsey Park, third floor-A Wing, declared Jan. 18
  • Country Terrace, Nottinghill Unit, declared Dec. 28
  • Dearness Home, Oakdale, declared Dec. 29
  • Earls Court Village, second and third floor, declared Jan. 2
  • Elmwood Place, facility-wide, declared Dec. 27
  • Extendicare, first floor, declared Dec. 24
  • Henley Place LTC Residence, facility-wide, declared Dec. 29
  • Highview Residence – Chapin House, facility-wide, declared Jan. 7
  • Manor Village at London, 4 West and 4 Centre, declared Jan. 10
  • McCormick Home, Evergreen unit, declared Dec. 14
  • Meadow Park Care Centre, Blue Unit, declared Jan. 1
  • Strathmere Lodge, Bear Creek, declared Jan. 6
  • Village of Glendale Crossing, facility-wide, declared Dec. 25

A previously reported outbreak at Westmount Gardens, Daisy Unit, declared Jan. 3, was listed as resolved as of Jan. 20.

Vaccinations

The MLHU announced Thursday that the mass vaccination clinic at Earl Nichols Recreation Centre is now accepting walk-ins.

As of the end of day Jan. 15, 89.1 per cent of residents aged five and older in the region have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine while 83.2 per cent have had two doses.

The percentage of people who’ve received third doses climbed to 38.5 per cent from 31.8 per cent. Note that those under 18 are not currently eligible for a third dose.

First dose coverage for those aged five to 11 stands at 54.1 per cent.

Read more:

COVID-19 supply chain woes extend to medical supplies, blood collection tubes

Health unit data shows that since Dec. 10, 34.48 per cent of hospitalized cases have involved people who were unvaccinated. Note that unvaccinated residents make up only 10.9 per cent of the region’s five-and-older population as of Jan. 15.

Of the 24 deaths reported in the past six weeks, 18 involved fully vaccinated individuals and eight involved unvaccinated individuals.

On the health unit’s website, residents can find information on pop-up clinics, mass vaccination clinics and pharmacies, as well as guidance for anyone vaccinated outside of the province or country, transportation support for those in need and more.

Ontario

Ontario reported 4,114 people in hospital with COVID on Friday (54 per cent admitted because of the virus) with 590 in intensive care units (82 per cent admitted because of the virus).

Read more:

4,114 people in Ontario hospitals with COVID, 590 in intensive care

Last Friday, hospitalizations were at 3,814, with the number of people in ICUs at 527.

The province also reported 7,165 new infections Friday, though that is an underestimate due to recent testing restrictions. Another 62 deaths were also recorded.

Elgin and Oxford

Southwestern Public Health will hold two pop-up clinics specifically for staff in school, school support or child-care settings, as well as children aged five-to-11 and their parents, and staff in long-term care or retirement homes.

One clinic will be held at the Ontario Police College on Jan. 21 and the other at the Tillsonburg Community Centre on Jan. 25. Both run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Appointments can be booked online through the “targeted populations” priority designation or over the phone at 1-800-922-0096 x 9 on weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Southwestern Public Health reported 52 hospitalizations on Friday, compared to 27 a week ago. Ten are in the ICU, up from seven a week ago.

The test positivity rate for the week of Jan. 9 was 16.5 per cent, down from 19.5 per cent the week of Jan. 2.

As for cases, SWPH is reporting:

  • 9,533 cases (an increase of 93 with one case removed due to data cleanup)
  • 860 active cases (a decrease of 14)
  • 8,543 resolved cases (an increase of 77; note that SWPH clears all cases after 10 days regardless of outcome)
  • 130 total deaths (an increase of one)

The death reported Friday involved a woman in her 70s and was tied to the Woodingford Lodge Outbreak in Woodstock.

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There are active outbreaks at the following long-term homes, retirement homes and hospitals:

  • Valleyview Nursing Home, St. Thomas, declared Dec. 23 and involving 17 resident cases, 32 staff cases and one death
  • Woodingford Lodge, Woodstock, declared Dec. 28 and involving 14 resident cases, 19 staff cases and two deaths
  • Tillsonburg Retirement Residence – Tillsonburg, declared Dec. 29 and involving three resident cases and one staff case
  • Chartwell Oxford Gardens, Woodstock, declared Dec. 30 and involving 12 resident cases and four staff cases
  • Caressant Care Bonnie Place Retirement Home, St. Thomas, declared Dec. 30 and involving 17 resident cases, 11 staff cases, one death and two cases under investigation
  • Caressant Care Bonnie Place Nursing Home, St. Thomas, declared Dec. 30 and involving 27 resident cases, 20 staff cases and one case under investigation
  • Elgin Manor, St. Thomas, declared Dec. 31 and involving nine resident cases and 13 staff cases
  • Beattie Manor Retirement Residence, Wardsville, declared Jan. 17 and involving five resident cases
  • Extendicare, Port Stanley, declared Jan. 2 and involving nine resident cases and 12 staff cases
  • Maple Manor Nursing Home, Tillsonburg, declared Jan. 18 and involving three resident cases and 10 staff cases
  • Terrace Lodge, Aylmer, declared Jan. 2 and involving 18 resident cases, five staff cases and one death
  • Secord Trails, Ingersoll, declared Jan. 2 and involving 41 resident cases, 24 staff cases and two deaths
  • Chartwell Aylmer, Aylmer, declared Jan. 2 and involving six resident cases and seven staff cases
  • Alexandra Hospital, Ingersoll, declared Jan. 3 and involving nine patient cases and three staff cases
  • Caressant Care Nursing Home – Woodstock, declared Jan. 3 and involving one resident case and 16 staff cases
  • Maples Nursing Home – Tavistock, declared Jan. 7, involving three resident cases, 14 staff cases and one case under investigation
  • Arches Transitional Bed Program, Woodstock, declared Jan. 10 and involving 16 resident cases, 14 staff cases and one case under investigation
  • Woodingford Lodge, Ingersoll, declared Jan. 12 and involving three staff cases
  • Cedarview Living Retirement, Woodstock, declared Jan. 13 and involving eight resident cases and one staff case
  • Metcalfe Gardens Retirement Home, St. Thomas, declared Jan. 13 and involving 13 resident cases and six staff cases
  • Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital, Tillsonburg, declared Jan. 18 and involving three resident cases

A previous outbreak at Woodingford Lodge, Tillsonburg, declared Jan. 11 and involving six staff cases, is no longer listed as active.

As of Jan. 19, 77.2 per cent of those aged five and older in the region had received two doses of the vaccine, while 82.4 per cent have had at least one dose.

Further information on where and how to get vaccinated can be found on the health unit’s website.

The health unit encouraged people to join its Same-Day Vaccination List, which offers any leftover doses due to cancellations or no-shows.

Huron and Perth

Global News is awaiting Friday’s data from Huron Perth Public Health.

On Thursday, Huron Perth Public Health reported eight people were in hospital with COVID-19, compared to nine a week ago.

Of those, four are considered to be active cases.

Data on the number of health-care workers with active COVID-19 infections was not available but it was reported at 130 on Wednesday. Last Thursday, HPPH reported 95 health-care workers with active cases of COVID-19.

For the week of Jan. 9, the test positivity rate was 10 per cent, down from 11 per cent the week of Jan. 2.

In total, HPPH reported:

  • 4,670 total cases (an increase of 49)
  • 78 deaths to date (unchanged)

The number of active cases and the number of recoveries were not available but as of Wednesday, the figures were 1,294 and 3,248, respectively.

The most recent deaths were reported on Jan. 11 when two deaths were added to the tally, no further details were provided.

Read more:

First shipment of Paxlovid, antiviral COVID-19 drug, arrives in Ontario

There are 14 active outbreaks reported by HPPH, including nine at long-term care or retirement homes:

  • Braemar Nursing Home, North Huron, declared Jan. 12 and involving nine residents and nine staff cases
  • Hillside Manor, Perth East, declared Dec. 31 and involving six staff cases
  • Kingsway Lodge, St. Marys, declared Jan. 3 and involving 12 resident cases and 14 staff cases
  • Knollcrest Lodge, Perth East, declared Jan. 12 and one resident case and involving five staff cases
  • Caressant Care Retirement Home, North Perth, declared Jan. 2 and involving five resident cases
  • Exeter Villa, South Huron, declared Jan. 2 and involving 10 resident cases and 3 staff cases
  • Goderich Place, Goderich, declared Jan. 8 and involving two resident cases and two staff cases
  • Maplewood Manor Retirement Home, Huron East, declared Dec. 30 and involving two resident cases and two staff cases
  • Seaforth Manor Retirement Home, Huron East, declared Jan. 2 and involving seven resident cases and three staff cases

HPPH is reporting five outbreaks at congregate living settings but no further details were provided.

A previously reported outbreak at Stratford General Hospital, declared Jan. 7, involving three patients and eight staff members, is no longer listed as active.

As of Jan. 17, 83.9 per cent of residents aged five and older have had at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose while 79.1 per cent are fully vaccinated. Third-dose coverage stands at 45.4 per cent of those five and older, though those under the age of 18 are not eligible for a third dose.

Information on how and where to get a vaccine can be found on the health unit’s website.

Sarnia and Lambton

Bluewater Health reported 53 patients in hospital with confirmed COVID-19, compared to 41 a week ago. Of those 53, nine are in the ICU.

Lambton Public Health is reporting the average ICU occupancy was at 78 per cent for the week of Jan. 9, down from 95 per cent for the week of Jan. 2.

The test positivity rate for the week of Jan. 9 was 31.8 per cent, up from 28.5 per cent the week prior.

On Friday, Lambton Public Health reported:

  • 8,202 total cases (an increase of 89)
  • 624 active cases (an increase of 18)
  • 7,477 resolved cases (an increase of 71)
  • 101 deaths to date (unchanged)

The most recent deaths were reported on Jan. 19, no details were provided.

Read more:

First shipment of Paxlovid, antiviral COVID-19 drug, arrives in Ontario

LPH reported 17 active outbreaks as of Friday, including at the following congregate living facilities:

  • Lambton County Developmental Services in Oil Spring, declared Jan. 19 and involving fewer than five residents and fewer than five staff cases
  • Lambton County Developmental Services in Wyoming, declared Jan. 9 and involving fewer than five resident cases and fewer than five staff/caregiver cases
  • Huron House Boys Home in Brights Grove, declared Jan. 8 and involving fewer than five residents and five staff/caregivers
  • Community Living Sarnia-Lambton in Sarnia, declared Jan. 7 and involving fewer than five residents and fewer than five staff/caregivers

A previous outbreak at St. Francis Advocates in Petrolia, declared Jan. 7 and involving fewer than five residents and fewer than five staff/caregivers, was declared over Jan. 20.

There are outbreaks at the following long-term care and retirement homes:

  • Country Manor Estates in Lambton Shores, declared Jan. 17 and involving fewer than five residents and fewer than five staff
  • Fairwinds Lodge in Sarnia, declared Jan. 10 and involving fewer than five residents and fewer than five staff
  • Watford Quality Care in Watford, declared Jan. 5 and involving 10 resident cases and six staff cases
  • Trillium Villa in Sarnia, declared Jan. 3 and involving 41 residents and 35 staff/caregivers
  • Marshall Gowland Manor in Sarnia, declared Jan. 1 and involving fewer than five residents and 16 staff/caregivers
  • Afton Park Place in Sarnia, declared Dec. 31 and involving fewer than five residents and 15 staff/caregivers
  • Sumac Lodge in Sarnia, declared Dec. 31 and involving 36 resident cases and 30 cases among staff/caregivers
  • Fiddick’s Nursing Home in Petrolia, declared Dec. 30 and involving 14 residents and 26 staff/caregivers

There are two hospital outbreaks and a jail outbreak. The outbreak at Sarnia Jail in Sarnia was declared Jan. 8 and involves 32 inmates and fewer than five staff members.

One outbreak at Bluewater Health in Sarnia declared Jan. 7 involves 15 patients and 10 staff members. A second outbreak at Bluewater Health was declared Jan. 14 and involves seven patients and 12 staff members.

There are two outbreaks in unidentified workplaces, one declared Jan. 17 and involving three cases and one declared Jan. 11 involving six cases.

Read more:

Staycation boom could revitalize domestic tourism as pandemic persists

Among area residents aged five and older, 82 per cent have had at least one dose of vaccine, 77 per cent have had two doses and 41 per cent have had a third dose. Note that those under 18 are not currently eligible for a third dose.

Residents can book and re-book COVID-19 vaccine appointments or find information on vaccine availability at pharmacies using the health unit’s registration page. People can also contact the vaccine call centre at 226-254-8222.

Those who are able to get vaccinated on short notice are encouraged to sign up for Lambton Public Health’s daily Vaccine Standby List.

— with files from Gabby Rodrigues

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Former Belleville, Ont. CAS worker will wait to be sentenced

A former Children’s Aid worker from Belleville, Ont., won’t be sentenced for at least another week after defence and the Crown made their submissions during a sentencing hearing on Friday.

In October 2021, Sandra Forcier was convicted of sexual assault and one count of sexual exploitation in relation to one victim, who was not in her care while she was a supervisor at a Highland Shores Children’s Aid group home. She was found guilty of another count of sexual exploitation in relation to a youth whom she met as a ward of the group home.

The incidents Forcier is convicted of took place during 2012 and 2013 inside the group home and eventually at Forcier’s home.

The Crown attorney pointed to several other court cases in which the accused was convicted of similar offences to come up with his request for four and a half years for each of the two victims for a total of nine years. However, the defence is seeking a sentence in the range of five to six years.

Read more:

Former Belleville CAS worker found guilty of sexual assault, exploitation of 2 minors

The Crown also took into account that the 119 days already served in prison, for this and other unrelated offences, could be counted against her penitentiary term and would amount to a total of six months time served.

The Crown also did not submit any victim impact statements, but did note one of the victims, who cannot be identified due to a publication ban, turned down their request because he says he was emotionally spent from the process of being a witness during the trial.

However, during the Friday sentencing hearing, it was made aware to the courts that Forcier has been battling mental health issues since 2014, a year after the offences she was convicted of. She’s even had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, although it’s one her lawyer says she disputes.

While it’s not been documented, her defence lawyer, Jason Easton, suggested she could have been battling mental health problems during the time of the incidents, as one of the victims pointed out that Forcier at one point believed she was being followed by the CIA. However, the victim said he believed that behaviour had more to do with drug use than mental health issues.

Forcier is currently receiving psychiatric treatment at Providence Continuing Care, and Judge Patrick Hurley is worried that his sentence, which he admits will certainly be a penitentiary sentence, would interfere with the care he says she obviously needs.

Forcier has been remanded into custody and will be back before the courts on Jan. 28 at 10 a.m.

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